Description

This course is suitable for you if you are a psychology graduate or graduate of another relevant discipline e.g. counselling, health sciences, nursing, criminal justice, law and police science. It is also suitable if you’re a professional working in an organisation or setting where survivors of abuse are assisted.

Our MSc Psychology of Coercive Control provides advanced insights and knowledge of cutting-edge practice and research about coercive control and behaviour and its development and effects on individuals, families and organisations. You will develop a deep understanding of the psychological processes involved in coercive and controlling behaviour across a variety of settings including in domestic relationships, human trafficking and groups and organisations more widely.

On this course, you will receive tailored support from a highly experienced and qualified team of psychology and professional staff who are involved in advancing practice and research regarding the prevention, effects and recovery from coercive and controlling behaviour.
You will be very well placed to advance your career in a variety of professions where the government is seeking to develop provision for the prevention of and recovery from coercive control and abuse and you will also be very well prepared to apply for a professional doctorate and research career paths in psychology and other relevant disciplines

Study Details:

1 year full-time, 3 years part-time, online learning

Module Details:

Year one (full-time study option)
Research Methods in Psychology
The Aetiology and Psychology of Coercive Control
The Anatomy of Coercive Control in Comparative Contexts
Psychological Approaches to Recovery from Coercive Control
Dissertation

Part-time route

Year one
The Aetiology and Psychology of Coercive Control (30 credits)
The Anatomy of Coercive Control in Comparative Contexts (30 credits)

Year two
Research Methods in Psychology (30 credits)
Psychological Approaches to Recovery from Coercive Control (30 credits)

Year three
Dissertation (60 credits)

Student Destinations

This course is an excellent way to take your career forward positively in a number of professions and in particular equips graduates with great opportunities to advance professionally in the field of support and prevention of domestic abuse, human trafficking and abuse in groups and organisations more widely (whether as a new career or as a continuation of an existing career in these fields). This is an area where the government is seeking to grow provision and specialist roles and you will have a range of career choices open to you across different practice settings. As well as within the psychology field, you will also be able to pursue successful careers in the Home Office, the police and the Civil Service, as well as in schools, colleges and universities.

This master’s course also is an excellent way to prepare for a clinical psychology doctorate and provides you with a great grounding that will boost an application for a doctorate in clinical psychology, forensic or counselling psychology or doctorates in other relevant disciplines.

Fees

Please see our website

Entry Requirements

A 2.1 honours degree or equivalent in psychology or other relevant disciplines including counselling, health sciences, nursing, criminal justice, law and police science.

Please see our website for how to apply

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Key Information

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University Hub

University of Salford

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